The Importance of Male Health | Centre for Veterinary Education

The Importance of Male Health

Michael Adams

Indigenous Seminar Series

Duration: 47:50

Thursday, May 12, 2016


Talk summary

The process of colonisation completely demoralised the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males. Men’s roles, in particular, have suffered as the result of changes to traditional lifestyle and the disruption of family structures.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men have been disempowered through the reduction of their authority and status, and also because of restrictions on their cultural activities and values.

Past policies and practices over many generations have been instrumental in shaping Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men’s lifestyle. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men are in a state of astonishment with a sense of worthlessness, deeply influenced by historical processes.  As there are few opportunities for personal achievement and recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men: high unemployment, discrimination, family disruption and breakdown and profound social disadvantage have contributed to the poor mental health status of Aboriginal men. 

Presenter/s

Dr Mick Adams (Uncle Mick to most) is a descendent of the Yadhiagana/Wuthathi peoples of Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, having traditional family ties with the Gurindji people of Central Western Northern Territory with extended family relationship with the people of the Torres Straits, Warlpiri (Yuendumu), and East Arnhem Land (Gurrumaru) communities.

Mick is a Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet and also Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University. His research portfolio encompasses male sexual and reproductive health, suicide, mental health, diabetes, family violence, cardiovascular disease, public health and Building Indigenous Research Capacity.

Mick is recognised for his active involvement in addressing issues associated with the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males for over a decade and striving to ensure that male health issues are promoted and placed on the national and international agenda through advocacy, research, publication and health management.

His PhD research examined the prevalence and correlates of sexual dysfunction among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males, which includes the area of sexual and reproductive health.

Uncle Mick has recently received an Elders award from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Advisory Council for his active participation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander higher education. He has also has been recognised by his Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peers by being awarded their 2006 Deadlys Award for Outstanding Achievement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and by the Queensland University Technology by being awarded the 2010 Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumnus Award and the  2010 Faculty of Health Outstanding Alumnus Award.